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Welcome

Goddard Law’s Labor and Employment litigation practice seeks equality in the workplace. Our dedicated attorneys offer clients experienced, sophisticated, and cost-effective representation in discrimination and retaliation cases. Goddard Law has prevailed in actions involving all manner of employment discrimination claims, including sexual harassment, age, race, religion, gender, disability, and sexual orientation. Goddard Law is dedicated to representing employees and other individuals in all industries and at all employment levels. As advocates for workplace fairness, our passion and profession is to help advance the goals of employees and protect their rights against injustices at work. We understand how powerless individuals facing discrimination and retaliation can feel, and we have made it our duty to empower our clients to stand up to employers who have wronged them and also to move forward in the job market with confidence. The attorneys at Goddard Law are dogged and tenacious and don’t think twice about taking on employers of any size. As evidenced from the firms’ three recent trial wins, including jury verdicts of $1.34 million, $13.4 million and $2.35 million, Goddard Law is not afraid of “David and Goliath” situations. Our cases have been covered by major media outlets including the New York Times, New York Post, New York Daily News, Telemundo, Law.com, and The Daily Mail.

ATTORNEYS

Photo of Megan Goddard

Megan Goddard

Managing Attorney

Megan Goddard is an employment discrimination lawyer devoted to protecting equality in the workplace. She represents victims of all types of discrimination, including race, gender, disability, pregnancy, sexual orientation and national origin, as well as victims of sexual harassment...

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Elizabeth Budnitz

Associate Attorney

Elizabeth Budnitz has over ten years of experience in the public sector, working for justice both in the United States and abroad. After graduating from Brooklyn Law School (a member of the Brooklyn Law Review), she clerked for The Honorable Joan M. Azrack in the Eastern District of...

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Monica Welby

Associate Attorney

Monica Welby joined Goddard Law PLLC in September 2019. She represents individuals who face discrimination and retaliation in the workplace. Prior to joining the firm, Monica was the Deputy Director of Litigation at the Legal Action Center, a non-profit based in New York City, where she...

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PRACTICE AREAS

Goddard Law Weekly

TOPIC OF THE WEEK

Am I Entitled To Sick Leave?

Contrary to popular belief, there is no general legal requirement that employers give employees sick leave. While most employers do in fact give employees some paid time off each year to be used for sick leave, the law does not require employers to do so

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BLOG OF THE WEEK

Everyone can get coronavirus, but economic inequality means it will be worst for those at the bottom

Coronavirus doesn’t spare the powerful. As of this writing, two members of the House, a senator, and the president of Harvard University have tested positive. But as with so many things in the unequal United States of America, it’s going to be worse for people who are already vulnerable: low-income people, people in rural areas, homeless people, single parents, inmates, and more.

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THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

Every time a woman leaves the workforce because she can't find or afford childcare, or she can't work out a flexible arrangement with her boss, or she has no paid maternity leave, her family's income falls down a notch. Simultaneously, national productivity numbers decline.

–Madeleine M. Kunin

LIST OF THE WEEK

from National Compensation Survey

U.S. workers and paid sick leave

  • 24% of U.S. civilian workers, or roughly 33.6 million people, do not have access to paid sick leave
  • 92% of workers in the top quarter of earnings (meaning hourly wages greater than $32.21) have access to some form of paid sick leave
  • Among the lowest-earning tenth – those whose wages are $10.80 an hour or less – just 31% have paid sick leave